Articles Tagged with addiction

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Oxycontin is one opioid causing addiction
One year ago a multidistrict litigation site (MDL 2804) was chosen as the venue for cities, counties, and states to bring civil actions against the makers of opioids. As I wrote about then, the opioid crisis has created huge burdens on states and municipalities. State and local governments have shouldered much of the cost of caring for individuals addicted to opioids. The federal government estimated that, in 2015 alone, 12.5 million people misused prescription opioids, and 33,000 people died from opioid overdose. In 2013, opioid abuse resulted in over $78.5 billion in economic losses. Cities, counties, and states have picked up much of that staggering cost. These government entities in MDL 2804 are fighting back, and many have filed lawsuits against the makers of opioids to recoup the billions of dollars lost in this ongoing crisis.

And while MDL 2804 is critically important, and overdue, other groups of opioid victims do not necessarily “fit” within the concept of an MDL focused on government plaintiffs. Among other victims, huge numbers of infants have been born addicted to opioids. Starting life this way creates layers of physical, mental, and emotional challenges. These children are the ultimate “innocent victims,” and they deserve an MDL court dedicated to ensuring a fair and full opportunity to seek compensation for their injuries.

Opioid-Addicted Infants Present Unique Claims

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Damages in a Lawsuit Involving Opioids
The opioid epidemic in America is a national crisis. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control recently reported that more than 64,000 people died in 2016 from drug overdoses, with the great majority of those deaths caused by opioids. The numbers for 2017 only look worse.

Last month, I wrote about whether people affected by the opioid epidemic can sue the drug manufacturers and distributors, doctors, pharmacies, and other suppliers who contributed to the addiction that destroyed their lives. But what can victims recover in lawsuits involving dangerously addictive prescription drugs?

You know all too well what you have lost—your financial security, your health, or perhaps even a loved one’s life. Now, let’s review the legal terms we use to discuss these losses.

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Opioids: Are Individual Lawsuits Imminent?
Have you been directly affected by the opioid epidemic in America? Millions of people have become addicted to these powerful drugs—and for many, that addiction started with a legally prescribed medication to treat legitimate pain. One report estimated that more than 59,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2016—and most of those were caused by opioids. The President has even declared opioid abuse a national public health emergency.

I’ve written before in this space about the opioid epidemic and the massive opioid litigation gearing up across America as well as the establishment of centralized multidistrict litigation. So far, these cases primarily involve state and local governments suing opioid manufacturers and distributors for their roles in the opioid crisis.

No doubt governments have suffered financial losses from the skyrocketing number of overdoses requiring emergency treatment. In North Carolina alone, the cost of opioid-related accidental overdose deaths was estimated at $1.3 billion in 2015.

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Oxycontin and the Opioid Crisis
Over the past few years, an opioid epidemic has caused horrific problems for many regions of the country. In 2015 alone, the US Department of Health and Human Services estimated that 12.5 million people misused prescription opioids, causing over 33,000 overdose deaths. In 2013, the opioid epidemic resulted in $78.5 billion in economic losses.  In response to this tragic loss of life and the economic strain placed on many state and local governments, several lawsuits have begun.

What Exactly Are Opioids?

Opioids are synthetic or semi-synthetic forms of opiates (like morphine). Opiates are derived directly from the poppy plant while opioids are manufactured chemicals that are very similar to opiates.