Articles Tagged with consumer protection

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Let me see if I have this straight: There is a huge medical device manufacturer that earns over $75 billion dollars each year. This corporation decides to market and sell a new medical device. The corporation refuses to do extensive testing on the device because that would take too long and cost too much money. In fact, preliminary studies showed problems with the device, and the company believes extensive clinical testing may reveal more problems, further slowing its path to the market (and to big profits). Instead, the company seeks fast-track approval of the device. The company argues that because the device looks similar to a device already on the market, it should be allowed to sell the new device without extensive testing. This process is known as the 510(k) pathway, and I’ve written about it a ton on this site, including last week. In the application the company reassures the FDA: “and don’t worry, we will keep an eye on the device and the patients who receive the device and if problems arise down the road we will let you know.”

So the FDA gives the multi-billion dollar corporation 510(k) approval to sell the device. In the first year the company sells one billion dollars’ worth of the device. In the second year it sells $1.5 billion in new devices, but it also begins to receive an alarming number of “adverse event” reports. This means patients are reporting problems and injuries after receiving the device. The company undertakes an internal study but does not report its findings to the FDA. In the third year it sells even more devices, but by now hundreds of adverse reports are rolling in. The injuries finally get the attention of the FDA, and the company reluctantly hands over its data on the many serious injuries caused by the new device.

Plaintiffs' Lawyers Are Consumer Protection Heroes
In the fourth year a woman with the implanted device is forced to undergo “revision surgery” to remove the device, and her recovery is lengthy and painful. She calls me and tells me her story. It is awful. She was once a competitive tennis player, but now she walks with a cane. She hasn’t played tennis in two years. She had to take time away from her job. Even with decent health insurance she has thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket medical bills related to the failure of the device.

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FDA Open Meeting on Off-Label Drug Use

Communications between pharmaceutical companies and medical device manufacturers and physicians are highly regulated by the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but the agency, as much as it may want to be, does not have the final say in all regulation. These companies have First Amendment commercial free speech rights (though they’re not as broad as the free speech rights individuals have) and there’s a tension between what the FDA wants companies to say, what these companies want to say, and what the courts say the companies can say.

The agency in late August published a notice of public hearing and request for comments concerning manufacturer communications regarding unapproved uses of approved or cleared medical products. The hearing will be held on November 9-10, 2016 in Silver Spring, Maryland, and in case you want to present information you must register by October 19. You could also send in written comments by January 9.

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California Product Liability LawsuitsCalifornia is a beautiful, diverse state. It has everything from wide, sandy beaches to snow-capped mountains, deserts, thick forests, wide open spaces and massive cities. It also has laws and a court system that’s seen as friendly to those injured by prescription medications. And after a recent court decision, more people in other states may be heading there to try their  product liability cases.

The California Supreme Court issued a decision in August which may encourage people harmed by prescription medications and medical devices from all over the country to file legal actions in the state. At issue is whether the state’s court system has jurisdiction over legal claims by people who’ve never been in California. In cases involving the drug Plavix, the answer was yes.

The eight lawsuits in question have 86 California residents and 592 people from 33 other states as plaintiffs. The defendant, Bristol-Myers Squibb, sought the dismissal of the claims by the 592 non-Californian plaintiffs.

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Depuy Pinnacle Jury AwardIn March 2016 five people injured by the Depuy Pinnacle metal-on-metal artificial hip scored a huge courtroom victory. In that case a Texas jury awarded five plaintiffs $502,043,908.00 for injuries suffered by the failure of the Depuy Pinnacle hip. That figure was divided in different ways to the five injured people. Of that amount, $360,000,000.00 was awarded by the jury for punitive damages. The jury concluded that the Pinnacle hip sold by Depuy was defective and that Depuy knew about the flaws but did not adequately warn patients and their doctors of the risks. Like I said, this was a huge win. Unfortunately, the punitive damages award did not last long.

Judge Forced to Reduce Punitive Damages Award

Punitive damages are money damages, separate from compensatory damages, which are awarded by a jury and which are intended to punish or deter a bad-acting defendant and others from engaging in similar conduct. Judge Kinkeade, who is the federal judge presiding over the Depuy Pinnacle multi-district litigation (MDL), stated that he was bound by a Texas statute which puts a limit or “cap” on the amount of punitive damages a jury can award. Thus, Judge Kinkeade was required by law to reduce the punitive damages award, which a jury of twelve individuals, after a 42 day trial, thought was appropriate.

Thank You, Tort Reform!

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