Articles Tagged with lawsuits

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If you have read any newspaper in the last year, you know that prescription opioids have caused massive suffering in this country. Addiction has skyrocketed. Sadly, deaths from overdoses and even opioid-related suicides have dramatically increased as well. In 2016 alone over 14,000 overdose deaths were reported from natural and semi-synthetic opioids, and over 20,000 people died of overdose from synthetic opioids (mostly fentanyl). Centers for Disease Control. Opioids have become a huge public health problem and a national tragedy. Inevitably, litigation has followed the suffering, and more lawsuits are being filed each week.

Despite the addictions, injuries, and deaths, and despite reports of awful business practices by the makers of these prescription painkillers, defense lawyers have developed certain legal defenses to help these drug companies avoid liability. Let’s look at a few:

The FDA Approved the Drug, So It’s the Government’s Fault

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Proton pump inhibitors may cause kidney disease
Millions of Americans have stomach issues, many of which are related to heart burn and acid reflux. Thankfully, there are several medicines available over-the-counter and by prescription that prevent and relieve these discomforts. Some drugs that help with these stomach issues are called proton pump inhibitors.

A proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is a medicine that reduces stomach acid. People take PPIs for heart burn, acid reflux, stomach ulcers, and other related conditions. While many PPIs are available by prescription only, some are becoming more readily accessible over-the-counter; you may have seen or heard of Prilosec, Prilosec OTC, Prevacid, or Nexium. These are all well-known PPIs.

PPIs work by preventing stomach acid from being produced – they stop heart burn, indigestion, and acid reflux before it begins. Many people take them first thing in the morning or take them before meals.

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Leukemia patient is prescribed drug Tasigna
If you have a specific type of leukemia—Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myeloid leukemia, or Ph+ CML—you may have been prescribed the chemotherapy drug Tasigna (nilotinib). Tasigna offers promise for some patients and may even be associated with remission of their disease—but it’s not without risks.

What’s more alarming, the drug’s manufacturer, Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, may have known about those risks and failed to disclose them to you. People who have been harmed or lost loved ones due to Tasigna have sued Novartis. Here’s what you need to know.

What Is Tasigna?

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Are you one of the almost 5 million Americans who have had total knee replacement or arthroplasty? This surgery is intended to resolve chronic knee pain, often due to rheumatoid arthritis, and restore mobility and quality of life. But sometimes, knee replacements go all wrong. One recent example is the Depuy Synthes Attune artificial knee.

The Attune Artificial Knee

The DePuy Synthes Attune artificial knee is marketed as an “innovative, comprehensive, integrated knee system” that provides stability, strength, and a greater range of motion post-surgery. This novel design was created to be a better approach to traditional knee replacements. But many people have experienced complete failure of their Attune knees shockingly soon after surgery.

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Opioids: Are Individual Lawsuits Imminent?
Have you been directly affected by the opioid epidemic in America? Millions of people have become addicted to these powerful drugs—and for many, that addiction started with a legally prescribed medication to treat legitimate pain. One report estimated that more than 59,000 people died from drug overdoses in 2016—and most of those were caused by opioids. The President has even declared opioid abuse a national public health emergency.

I’ve written before in this space about the opioid epidemic and the massive opioid litigation gearing up across America as well as the establishment of centralized multidistrict litigation. So far, these cases primarily involve state and local governments suing opioid manufacturers and distributors for their roles in the opioid crisis.

No doubt governments have suffered financial losses from the skyrocketing number of overdoses requiring emergency treatment. In North Carolina alone, the cost of opioid-related accidental overdose deaths was estimated at $1.3 billion in 2015.

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Arthritis Drug Actemra Many things in life involve a cost benefit analysis. We’re constantly taking risks that can cause harm, but choose to take on that risk because the benefits outweigh the dangers. A good example of this is driving a car. There is a risk of getting into an accident, but the benefit of having on-demand personal transportation is easily worth it.

Prescription medications are no different. Each one is intended to provide a benefit, although each will always have at least some side effects or adverse reactions. The question is never, “does the drug have a side effect or adverse reaction?” Rather, it’s “how many side effects and adverse reactions are there and how bad are they?”

It’s no surprise to learn that many medications on the market today have numerous side effects and adverse reactions, some of them deadly. Yet, they’re available for use not only because the benefits may outweigh the risks for a significant number of consumers, but also because the makers of the medication are required to inform consumers of these risks. So a pharmaceutical company that fails to properly warn consumers of the risks of its drugs can get into trouble. That’s exactly the issue with Actemra. Continue reading →

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Oxycontin and the Opioid Crisis
Over the past few years, an opioid epidemic has caused horrific problems for many regions of the country. In 2015 alone, the US Department of Health and Human Services estimated that 12.5 million people misused prescription opioids, causing over 33,000 overdose deaths. In 2013, the opioid epidemic resulted in $78.5 billion in economic losses.  In response to this tragic loss of life and the economic strain placed on many state and local governments, several lawsuits have begun.

What Exactly Are Opioids?

Opioids are synthetic or semi-synthetic forms of opiates (like morphine). Opiates are derived directly from the poppy plant while opioids are manufactured chemicals that are very similar to opiates.

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Type 2 Diabetes and OnglyzaWith the rise of Type 2 diabetes in the United States, drug makers have attempted to meet the demand for treatments to lower blood sugar levels in patients. A variety of drugs such as saxagliptin, alogliptin, linagliptin, sitagliptin, exenatide and liraglutide were developed to help patients treat their Type 2 diabetes. Several of these drugs have resulted in unexpected problems. One specific drug in particular is saxagliptin, which goes by the trade name “Onglyza.”

What Is Onglyza?

Onglyza was co-developed by Bristol-Meyers Squibb and AstraZeneca and is a DPP-4 inhibitor. It works by increasing the levels of incretin (a type of hormone) in the body. Incretins lower blood glucose levels by reducing the amount of sugar the liver makes and increasing the amount of insulin released by the pancreas.

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Patient Taking Taxotere Suffers Permanent Hair LossCancer is rough. It is a disease that has caused massive suffering, and virtually every family will be affected by it at some point. Doctors and scientists have tried to treat or cure cancer in patients ever since humans have existed as a species. In fact the name of this disease originates from ancient doctors who treated cancer and observed how a tumor’s appearance reminded them of crabs (cancer is Latin for crab).

Despite these efforts at fighting cancer over thousands of years, there is no complete cure and many current treatments, such as chemotherapy, have severe side effects.

Because of chemotherapy’s significant side effects and a general inability to completely cure the patient, a cost benefit analysis has always been important for cancer patients. Many cancer patients have to ask themselves if going through several weeks or months of misery is worth adding months or years to their lives. It’s an awful choice to make.

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Physiomesh Hernia Mesh
Hernia mesh is causing problems. People who have been implanted with hernia mesh have suffered adhesions (scar tissue that sticks together), inflammation, pain, allergic reactions, internal bleeding, infections, and many other injuries.

One of the hernia mesh products sold for years, Ethicon’s Physiomesh, has caused many of these health problems in patients. In revision or removal surgeries, the Physiomesh has been discovered to have shrunk, folded, or curled. Surgeons have found scar tissue surrounding the mesh. This scar tissue can cause severe pain and discomfort. In many cases, by the time the mesh is removed, the damage has been done and long-term problems remain.

What Is Hernia Mesh?